Posts Tagged 'Danalogic i-FIT ES 71'

The Shape of Things to Come?

 

I received a shock answerphone message from Clinic O the other day, and had to listen to it several times to make sure I’d heard correctly. Apparently there will be a delay on my hearing aid review appointment…of approximately 17 weeks. The original appointment to make some tweaks to the volume required a mere 12 week wait, so dabbling with your settings on the NHS is now a very long-drawn out affair. At this rate, the new user could find themselves eligible for their 3 yearly upgrade before initial adjustments to their new hearing aid have successfully concluded.

While I wait for my far-off appointment, I am amusing myself by dreaming of the day when I no longer need to interact with the infuriating volume wheel on the Danalogics. According to this New Scientist article, one day I might even be able to control the volume with my tensed knuckles instead. Apparently, some clever scientists at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have developed tattoos which can turn knuckles and freckles into smartphone controls.

Should the scientists at Saarland ever turn their attentions to the fiddly business of hearing aid controls instead of smartphones, my daily frustrations with the Danalogic iFIT 71 volume wheel could become a thing of the past.

For example, my right knuckle could be programmed to respond to tension from my clenched fist; as background noise suddenly intensifies while I’m having an important conversation, my whitening knuckles could send a command to my hearing aids to switch on the directional mics. Whenever someone starts hammering in the background while I’m doing a group tutorial, the digging of my fingernails into the tabletop could act as a signal to activate the mute setting. And when standing in front of a packed lecture theatre, I could discreetly swipe my knuckle tattoos to control the volume whilst my hearing aids are still on my ears. I currently have to take them off and peer at the volume dial through my reading glasses every time I accidentally brush the wheel with my hand when touching my hair.

Cool…

The original academic article from the Saarland team can be found here

See also DuoSkin tattoos from MIT Media Lab

I’m still waiting for someone to invent my hearing aid tattoos…

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Do these go to 11?

the mighty chipolata2

The mighty chipolatas are turning out to be something of a sheep in wolf’s clothing, and it seems that I have nothing to fear on the hissing front from the new, improved Danalogic i-FIT. In addition, it has been an unexpected delight to discover that they pick up virtually no nerve shredding background noise at work, unlike the Oticons. Unfortunately, over time, this appears to be down to the fact that the Danalogics are transmitting hardly any sound to my cookiebite ears at all, except for a slight Sean Connery slushiness on ‘SH’ fricatives that I can happily live without. My subjective observation that there is a distinct lack of difference between aided and unaided ears is backed up by a massive increase in the number of times during the day when the spouse sighs deeply, rolls his eyes and says “Have you got your bloody hearing aids in” and those are just the times I know about because I’m actually looking at him.

On the upside, my worries about navigating a volume wheel with no default stop have been allayed by simply turning the wheel as far up as it will go at all times; I have been assured that it can’t snap off and there is virtually no audible difference between the minimum 1 and maximum 4 setting anyway. If I’d ever tried that with the surround sound Oticons, my employers would have been scraping bits of my head off the architecturally acclaimed double height concrete ceiling the first time a metal chair leg was scraped across the studio floor.

Disappointingly, on the leisure side, TV is once more inaudible at, or below, spouse discomfort threshold levels, and on the music programme the piano is distressingly distorted. I’ll report on the telecoil setting if I ever find a working loop anywhere.

I have a follow-up at the beginning of October but, for once, I’m not too eager to discover the outcome…

The Upgrade part 3: Will hissssssstory repeat itself?


the mighty chipolata

“Good news, no great change since your last hearing test”, announced the charming audiologist as I handed the sweaty button-push back. “There’s a mild loss in the low frequencies, but nothing significant”.

I peered at the screen while she did a bit of wire untangling for the next bit, and beamed with pride as I spotted a perfect 0dB threshold in both ears at 4KHz. I always like to do well in a test, but zero dB, wow. This was actually 10dB better than it was back in 2010, so I surmised that I should be able to enjoy the hissing of leaves on the trees, the hissing of the sea, and the hissing of hearing aid circuitry for many more years to come. In fact, if things kept up at this rate of improvement, I might even be able to hear the hissing of other people’s hearing aid circuitry in five years’ time.

“Okay, you know the drill”, said the charming audiologist, as sound probes were wiggled into my ears and the chipolatas were wired up ready for programming. The Oticons, now prostrate and deaf on the table, looked tiny and vulnerable in comparison; I remembered my tragic abandonment of the Siemens Chroma S back in 2012 and vowed that this time, the Oticons were coming home with me until I knew that things were going to be alright. If the performance of the mighty chipolatas matched up to their size, I would be happy to let the Oticons go to NHS hearing aid heaven. If it didn’t…well, it didn’t bear thinking about, so I decided not to, just yet.

After the initial programming, the charming audiologist set about a bit of on-screen fiddling with settings, and I started to become anxious every time a hiss or distortion entered the setup. I wished, not for the first time, that I could do the fiddling bit myself, but after a short while, her work was done and the moment of truth arrived.

“Right, I’m just going to talk for a bit so that you can tell me how it sounds”, she said. I listened carefully, relieved that although I could hear some hiss thanks to my freak bat ear peak at 4KHz, it was nowhere near as loud as the last time with the original Danalogics. I’d rather have no hiss at all, but I could live with it. To my cookiebite ears, the 2012 originals had sounded like a basket of chips being lowered into a deep fat fryer at the initial fitting. This time, other than a mild hiss  and air-con sound, there was nothing distinctive to comment on, but there never is in a soundproof room with air-con. Result.

“Sounds okay –  ” I stopped in my tracks.

“Oh… my voice sounds different…not dramatically so, but…different…” I struggled in vain for a description to the sound, but nothing came apart from ‘boingyness’ and I thought I’d better just keep that one to myself since I was supposed to be articulate. I certainly couldn’t hear anything intrusively bad, so after a run-through of the controls and a small tantrum of disbelief upon discovering the fact that there was a volume wheel instead of a push button, no default beep indicator on the volume, and no mute setting, I decided I was ready to return to the outside world.

I thanked the charming audiologist for her genuinely charming and painstaking attentions, slid the sleeping Oticons off the edge of the table into my handbag, and set off with the chipolatas on my ears to experience a whole new world of Danalogic sound.


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